Tuesday, 7 October 2008

Shelter Pockets, Paible


Shelter Pockets, Paible

Living 3D piece - trees, windbreak fence, wooden posts


- comprises of three meadow copses on an exposed, grassy hillside. Facing into the prevailing South-West wind, the work expresses the battle for growth in harsh conditions. The fence, the allegorical 'Protector'. In spring, when narcissi bulbs emerge, the shapes become three circles, each separated by the 'S' shaped fence, reflecting the bay in which the piece is set.

18 comments:

aRae said...

Hi Laura, nice artwork...shows a great bond with the land; and your ability to establish a firmly rooted sense of place.
amanda

"Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it"
- Bertold Brecht.

Laura Donkers said...

Hi Amanda
Thanks for comment. Not too sure how this 'blogging' business works. Have you added your artwork to the 'Wish you were here' site?

maggieuibhist said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Digital Dakini said...

Thank you for sharing your fantastic piece - I can feel the salty wind in the sea grasses all the way in Philadelphia!
Did you meet Andy Goldsworthy?

Laura said...

Hi Laura, I'm a Laura as well. Amazing work, I did notice that in your pictures the rest of the land looks barren. Is it just where the artwork is located or is it really hard to sustain plant life on the island? I hope you take pictures of it in the spring so I can see how the dynamics of your piece change. It looks beautiful there, much different than Philadelphia. Here in the city we have a group called Greens Grow that turns chemically saturated land into fertile clean soil for growth. I'm sure your land is not chemically altered but you both are promoting plant life. About the piece, Did you plant first or build first? Great Work, Keep it up, Laura

Christy Hahn said...

Hi Laura,

What a thoughtful, beautiful piece. I love how you built art into the landscape and have also created an environment for vegetation to flourish where it does not naturally do so. Brilliant!

Christina, Philadelphia, PA

norcrossl said...

Very inspiring. I can almost feel the wind because of the lines made by the grass. Beautiful!

lebuck8 said...

Hi Laura,
Not being a big fan of wind, I found your artwork intriguing. I would love see pictures of it in spring!
Lauren

gracki said...

Dear Laura,
I would love to one day be able to construct something as articulate, enchanting and natural as you! I am sincerely impressed. Beautiful work!
Your friend,
Grace Ahn- Philadelphia

Amy said...

I think your work is beautiful, I t makes me want to visit and see it in person!
Amy

Art Ed Guy said...

Hello Laura, I like that your work is both artistic and functional at the same time. It certainly makes a strong connection to the place it inhabits. As a visual piece of sculpture, it is a quiet and simplistic with elegant lines - as a functional piece, it is protective and probably necessary for some plants to remain firmly rooted to the soil. A good example of form following function. Nice work.

Sam said...

You can feel the wind blowing when you look at this piece. I want to touch the plants and feel the breeze. Living in a city can make you long for nature and it is nice to see images like this.

maggie said...

Hi laura, to grow requires commitment skill and hope, I love how the curve of the soreline is mirrored in the line of the fence, how it almost suggests a bridge between the present and what would have been there in the past.

anne corrance monk said...

Hi Laura
I too love trees.Using any kind of plant material in a work ensures it is constantly changing and evolving. I love that,even though it makes me a bit sad. It's all about embracing trancience.....anne

Digital Dakini said...

Using plants as an living art medium is very interesting and reminds me of the work of Mel Chin. In his installation,Revival Field, plants are used to restore a polluted area. Your piece celebrates the universally restorative effect of green beauty, which is welcome everywhere.

lebuck8 said...

Laura,
Do you have any other installation pieces? If so are they also a part of nature, or do you also work with found materials?

jmkilburn said...

Maybe they could use something like this is Iceland... it's such a volcanic, windswept island, and the mountains there look like the mountains here in the US southwest; rocky and impenetrable. The tops of the mountains slope down to rocks and debris, which get coated in lichens and moss, and further down the finest pebbles and dust slowly become topsoil. At the very bottom, it can be very fertile and green. Is there any meaning for you to the S shape?

Bryan said...

Extremely thoughtful work. I wonder if you consider this piece to closer in relation to ecological art or environmental art?? I sometimes wonder myself what the precise differences are between these terms.